Tag Archives: disability studies

“You should commit suicide”: On Americans’ Lack of Empathy for People with Disabilities and Chronic Illnesses.

  Americans are often unwilling, or unable, to empathize with chronically ill and/or disabled people. Some rough thoughts on this topic: 1.) Disabled people (and this includes chronically ill people) are a minority in the U.S., making up only 19% of … Continue reading

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Complicating Disability Studies’ Relationship to Medicine

One of Disability Studies’ major hang-ups is its default position with respect to the field of medicine and—by extension—with medical practitioners. The adversarial stance of DS towards medicine (and doctors) stems largely from the former’s repudiation of the medical model … Continue reading

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Multiple Sclerosis: The First Two Years.

What I remember most about the first two years of MS is the hunger. I remember lying flat on my mattress, hungry. Close your eyes, go back to sleep. I’m hungry. I’m tired. No: I’m decimated. In this game of … Continue reading

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Who’s afraid of chronic illness as disability? An entire field, apparently.

Here is a crucial point: the exhaustion of disabled research subjects comes by way of our historical investment in believing that disability makes a person available for excessive experimentation and bureaucratic oversight (Snyder and Mitchell 28, original italics). The prevailing position … Continue reading

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